Category Archives: Uncategorized

Studio Policy Guidance 101

Yesterday I had a discussion with a parent who was looking for a violin teacher.  She commented that one of the teachers she considered sent her a 10 page studio policy as soon as she contacted him about lessons. This parent felt overwhelmed, and her comment was, “I don’t care about a studio policy.  I already know there will be a studio policy I must comply with; I want to know what can he do for my child!”

Coming from a parent who is very serious about lessons and respectful of a teacher’s time,  got me thinking. I think the length and content of a studio policy is important to consider. Every teacher wants to acquire students, so how can we set boundaries, yet not overwhelm parents?

successful-studio-policy-imageI think we first need to consider what to include in a studio policy. Your studio policy shouldn’t address everything and the “kitchen sink!” So what should your studio policy include?

You only need three main parts to your studio policy.

  1. Tuition and Studio Activities

  • How tuition is charged: rate/hour, monthly, etc.

  • Acceptable methods of payment: check, cash, or credit card?

  • Due dates for payments and when late fees are assessed, if any

  • Special fees charged: recital fees, music books, etc.

  • General information about recitals and group lessons, as applicable

  1. Cancellations

  • Makeup policy if you or the student misses a lesson

    • 24 hour or more notification?

  • Policy for bad weather days

 

  1. Important Standing Rules

  • Such as washing hands before lessons etc

Your studio policy should be no more than 1 to 1 and a half pages in length and should be written so it is easy to read and understand.

What about addressing all the little things that bother you?

For those of us who teach from our homes, we may be tempted to use our studio policy to address various irritations such as:

  • students wandering to private areas of our home

  • students tracking mud on our floors or staining furniture with food, etc.

  • parents visiting long after a student’s lesson is complete

It’s always best to assume that most people are respectful of your home and time and to handle the exceptions on a case by case basis.  If several families are taking extra liberties, then send a polite email to specifically address an issue.  In general, sending respectful  emails or personally speaking with a parent are better methods than using your studio policy to address issues that have irritated you.  You want prospective parents to be motivated to join your studio, not overwhelmed by all your rules!

Five Things to do with Aqua Rocks in a Piano Lesson

Ever used aqua rocks or glass gems in your studio?  Ten years ago when I picked up a bag of aqua rocks, (the ones used in fish bowls and floral arrangements; you can find some here (link)) I had no idea how much my students would enjoy using them and how versatile they would be in lessons! Students of various ages enjoy using the gems. Maybe students like the gems because they are shiny and have a nice, smooth texture. If you are in need of a new resource to refresh your teaching, I highly recommend purchasing a bag of glass gems at your local craft store. These gems are an inexpensive resource and come in a variety of colors. Here are five ways you can use those new gems in your studio.

Aqua Rocks Post Image

Learning Key Names

When students are first learning the names of the piano keys, using gems and a set of letter cards is a great way to practice the key names. To play, shuffle a set of musical alphabet cards and place them on the piano bench next to a selection of glass gems. Have the student draw the top letter card and place a gem on the correct key. Play continues until all the letter cards are gone, or at least one key of each letter in the musical alphabet is covered.

The Ultimate Game Token or Bingo Chip

Gems are my students’ first choice when it comes to game tokens and bingo chips. Anytime you are playing a game that requires students to cover a space on a game board, gems can easily be used and add some extra fun to the game. If your selection of gems is different colors, you can also use them for game tokens.

Listening Activities

Aqua rocks can be used when implementing listening activities with students such as discerning major or minor intervals, high or low notes, or other listening skills. Provide a worksheet for students, and instead of writing their answer,  provide aqua rocks for them to place on the example you played. Since aqua rocks are round, they make great notes.

Melodic Dictation

This game goes well with the above listening activities. If your students need to practice melodic dictation by listening then writing the notes they hear played, this method is a great way to isolate identifying notes by ear.

  • Provide students a piece of staff paper with lines and spaces large enough for the aqua rocks to represent notes. As you play a melody for the students, ask them to place the gems on the correct places on the staff to represent the melody you played.

  • Remember you should tell students what note you started on to provide a reference point.

  • After students have placed the gems on which notes they think you played, instruct them to check their work while you play the melody again. By using gems to mark notes, students can easily change the notes without time consuming erasing.

  • Once students have determined the correct notes with gems,  instruct them to write the notes on their staff paper, notating proper rhythm.

 

Counting Aid

Working with your students on a particular section of their piece? Aqua rocks are a fun but simple way to keep track of repetition in practice. For each time a student plays a section correctly, have them place a gem on the music stand to keep track of their progress. (Remember studies show that keeping repetition to 4 or 5 times is more effective than excessive repetition.)

Teaching Form

Gather a selection of different colored aqua rocks,and use them to teach form or to identify and practice different sections of a piece. For example, if you have an ABA form, instead of giving each section a letter, give it a color. Put multiple gems of each chosen color in a cup, such as three blues for the A section and three greens for the B section. Have students close their eyes and select a gem. Whichever color they select is the section they will play. Continue instructing students to close their eye, select a gem, and play the section selected until all the gems are gone.   This method is very effective in helping students gain confidence in playing pieces from memory.

A Practice Incentive to Keep Your Students Excited To Learn

After the Christmas break students usually return to piano lessons refreshed and excited to learn, but what happens when that motivation wears off mid-January? Do you have a plan to keep students practicing all semester?

If you need a technique to keep your students excited and consistent in their practice, I have the perfect resource for you.

Blog image

This practice incentive is easy to implement and fun for students. It rewards overachieving students AND motivates students who need extra help remembering to practice.

All you need to do is download the materials and print. All the work is done for you!  (You will need to purchase a rubber stamp as indicated in the instructions.)

If you want to ensure the practice incentive is successful in your studio, here are some suggestions that promote excitement and anticipation in students regarding the incentive.

Talk about the incentive at lessons.

Share the incentive in your studio newsletter

And if you are feeling particularly motivated, decorate your studio in a safari theme!

Click here to download the materials now, and prepare your studio for a successful semester of practice.

 

9 Tips for a Successful Studio Recital

Is your recital coming up? Have you ever had recitals go smoothly only to be followed by the next semester’s recital that didn’t go quite the way you thought it would? I know I have.
Up until last fall all my recitals had always gone smoother than I could have asked, but this last December things didn’t go quite as planned. In fact, I barely got the programs printed because my printer broke, I got locked out of the church where the recital was to be held, and we almost completely ran out of punch and the first reception. Thankfully I got the programs printed at the last second, finally got into the church, and managed to secure more punch for the second recital and reception.

This experience got me thinking about what I already do to keep recitals flowing smoothly and if there was anything else I could do to keep recitals successful.

9 tips to help your studio recital be a huge success.

Here are a few things I have always done and a few I will add to this year’s recitals to do list (Like asking for a parent volunteer).

Confirm the church key or door code 24-48 hours in advance to make sure you have the proper code or key.

Print the programs more than a day in advance. Nothing is worse than running around the day of trying to print programs.

Ask for parent volunteers at the reception to serve punch and take wrappings off the finger foods so that you can visit with students and their parents.

Remind parents to bring a finger food items to share for the reception.

Have a recital run through of student’s pieces at the lesson(s) before the recital. Have young students practice walking up to the piano, playing their pieces, and bowing.(Group class is also another great place to practice this.)

Ask new students to arrive early at the recital so they can familiarize themselves with the location and piano.

Avoid starting late by requiring those playing to arrive by a specific time before the recital starts.

Have particularly young students or those who get nervous easily play early in the program so their nerves don’t “get a hold” of them.

Try to spend time after each recital speaking to each student and telling them specifically what they did well.

Make a point to speak to any parents you have not met yet or don’t see regularly.

What do you do to keep recitals successful? I would love to hear in the comments below. Or do you have a funny story of a recital flop? Locked out of the church, double booked location, or other flop? I would love to know I’m not the only one who worries the church will forget I booked the sanctuary for the entire afternoon.

Give your Studio the Extra Energy it Needs this Spring.

The semester is drawing to a close soon. Spring break and Easter are past and it is almost time for students to disperse for the summer. But there is still at least a month and a half left of lessons before summer!

About this time in the spring, piano teachers often start to wonder what their retention rate for the coming fall will be. We ask ourselves questions such as will my studio continue to grow or just be a constantly revolving door? Will I have open lessons slots that I need to fill in the fall? Do parents see the value in how and what I am teaching their children?

And to add to all this we often look forward to summer and a much needed break or lighter teaching schedule ourselves. Often after spring break, teaching can get just a little too predictable. There are no more exciting holidays or events around the corner. In the fall, there is the excitement of Halloween and right on its heels follows Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, and Valentines. Once spring rolls around things can start to become a little too predictable. Not only that, but the weather is finally warm enough and student’s practice quantity and quality starts to drop as spring sports become a serious contender for kid’s attention.

But overly predictable lessons are the last thing teachers need in May when parents start to evaluate what activities their children will be participating in next fall. Instead, parents need to see us energetic and excited to work with their children and how much their children are learning and having fun taking piano!

Give your studio that extra something special it needs this spring

So what can you add to your lessons that is easy, already planned, and won’t add to your steady growing list of things to be done before June?

Adding some new games to your studio is a great way to mix up lessons and keep kids excited about piano. Even if you use games already in your studio give a few new games a try this spring. Most likely you’ll find a few new games over the next few weeks keeps kids thrilled to attend their lessons this spring even though they could be out playing soccer.

And if you are a little worn out from a long school year here are a few games to freshen up lessons all planned and ready to use just click print!

Free Games

Princess Match Up

Catching Bugs

Carnival Ferris Wheel

 

More advanced games available for purchase

Key Signature Games

Caterpillar Scales

Note Value Pack

Leaping Lady Bug 

Submarine Hunt