Monthly Archives: February 2017

You are browsing the site archives by month.

Studio Policy Guidance 101

Yesterday I had a discussion with a parent who was looking for a violin teacher.  She commented that one of the teachers she considered sent her a 10 page studio policy as soon as she contacted him about lessons. This parent felt overwhelmed, and her comment was, “I don’t care about a studio policy.  I already know there will be a studio policy I must comply with; I want to know what can he do for my child!”

Coming from a parent who is very serious about lessons and respectful of a teacher’s time,  got me thinking. I think the length and content of a studio policy is important to consider. Every teacher wants to acquire students, so how can we set boundaries, yet not overwhelm parents?

successful-studio-policy-imageI think we first need to consider what to include in a studio policy. Your studio policy shouldn’t address everything and the “kitchen sink!” So what should your studio policy include?

You only need three main parts to your studio policy.

  1. Tuition and Studio Activities

  • How tuition is charged: rate/hour, monthly, etc.

  • Acceptable methods of payment: check, cash, or credit card?

  • Due dates for payments and when late fees are assessed, if any

  • Special fees charged: recital fees, music books, etc.

  • General information about recitals and group lessons, as applicable

  1. Cancellations

  • Makeup policy if you or the student misses a lesson

    • 24 hour or more notification?

  • Policy for bad weather days

 

  1. Important Standing Rules

  • Such as washing hands before lessons etc

Your studio policy should be no more than 1 to 1 and a half pages in length and should be written so it is easy to read and understand.

What about addressing all the little things that bother you?

For those of us who teach from our homes, we may be tempted to use our studio policy to address various irritations such as:

  • students wandering to private areas of our home

  • students tracking mud on our floors or staining furniture with food, etc.

  • parents visiting long after a student’s lesson is complete

It’s always best to assume that most people are respectful of your home and time and to handle the exceptions on a case by case basis.  If several families are taking extra liberties, then send a polite email to specifically address an issue.  In general, sending respectful  emails or personally speaking with a parent are better methods than using your studio policy to address issues that have irritated you.  You want prospective parents to be motivated to join your studio, not overwhelmed by all your rules!